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Our Mission & Vision

Our Mission & Vision


The International Vegetarian Union (IVU) is an internationally focused non-profit organisation whose mission is to promote veganism by sparking a global plant-based movement through the creation of resources which outline the many benefits of a plant-based diet as well as the negative impacts of animal derived product consumption.


Read more: Our Mission & Vision

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IVU Organization

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The International Vegetarian Union (IVU) is a global organization dedicated to promoting vegetarianism and its associated benefits. Its political structure and organization are defined by its Bylaws, which have been in effect since 1999 and have undergone modifications since then.

The IVU is governed by an International Council (IC), which is responsible for managing the organization's affairs. This council consists of eight elected members who serve four-year terms. They are chosen through an email ballot conducted every four years, with voting taking place from April 1-30. To be eligible for nomination, candidates must be vegetarian and hold a current position within a member organization.

The IC works together to make decisions on behalf of the IVU and its members. They can co-opt up to three additional members, who hold full voting rights until the next IC election. Furthermore, the IC can appoint Regional Representatives to strengthen the organization's global presence and encourage the formation of local vegetarian societies.

IVU members include Full Member Organizations, Associate Members, and Supporters. These members enjoy various benefits, such as access to resources and participation in events, but only Full Member Organizations hold voting rights.

The IVU hosts an annual event that combines features of congresses and vegfests, promoting vegetarianism and providing a platform for members to discuss the current state of the movement. General Meetings are held during these events, allowing members to engage in discussions and contribute to the organization's agenda.

In terms of finances, the IVU operates on a fiscal year determined by the IC, with a budget proposed and approved by the council members. The organization maintains banking accounts and ensures that financial statements are audited and made available for review.

The IVU is committed to working with Regional Organizations (ROs) as partners, with the IC negotiating and ratifying partnerships as needed. These partnerships serve to strengthen the organization's global reach and support the growth of vegetarianism around the world.

Overall, the International Vegetarian Union is a vibrant and dynamic organization, dedicated to promoting the benefits of vegetarianism and fostering a global community committed to a more compassionate and sustainable future.
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Department of Fund-raising

Key Responsibilities:

* Develop a sustainable, ethical, and long-term strategy for fundraising in conjunction with IVU’s financial ambitions and organisational goals. 

* Develop strong networks, internal and external partnerships to support IVU’s fundraising, wider development strategies and ambitions. 

* Develop and maintain effective supporter journeys, ensuring exceptional relationship management for all accounts within the supporter and philanthropy portfolio. From initial contact through to cultivation, solicitation, stewardship and if applicable retention.  

* Establish a strategy for generating revenue through newfound diverse means by identifying new potential income streams including grants and donors. Ensure access to such funds by producing effective, high-quality proposals and reports. 

* Identify opportunities to build new relationships on an international scale as well as representing IVU at various events to effectively increase network.  

* Set targets whilst monitoring the planning, budgetary and accounts on a regular basis, adapting operational plans as necessary.

Director: Asa Kaur Narinder

Asa Kaur has been a staunch vegetarian since birth, her devotion to the vegan movement and altruistic pursuits stem from her spirituality and heritage. She founded the Veg-N Society, a spiritually inclined non-profit organisation based on Namdhari cultural assets and ideologies.

Embracing the importance of utilising food as a crucial tool for effective animal activism, Asa provided a basis for action through her contributions as a plant-based recipe developer. Focusing on enabling a systemic change, her work within philanthropy is centred around demolishing factory farming and accelerating alternative protein innovation.

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Global hunger is coming: how to help those at risk

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The Russian invasion of Ukraine is rapidly disrupting the global supply of energy and food. In addition to Russia’s role as a large exporter of natural gas and oil, Russia and Ukraine together are responsible for about one-quarter of the global wheat exports, one-fifth of the global maize and barley and nearly two-thirds of the traded sunflower oil. Together with Belarus, they also produce over a third of the potassium, and about 15 percent of the phosphorus and nitrogen that are used to fertilize a large fraction of the crops that feed the world today. Naturally, energy and food prices (already high following the COVID-19 pandemic) are soaring, and major food shortages are expected still this year. The promise of hunger and hardship for tens of millions (2 billion people in some estimates) as of the end of this year should not be taken lightly.

Many societal emergencies leave no time for preventing their worst effects, therefore the exceptional advantage offered by the early warning of a global food crisis should not go wasted. There are, in fact, effective ways to optimize the use of available food and agricultural inputs, many of which are accessible to citizens, communities, institutions and governments. Reducing food waste - estimated at about 15-20 percent of total global food production at the household stage - is among them. A call for a relief effort would also be granted: those able to increase food production, from leisure farms to backyard allotments, should do it. While food security is the outcome of multiple driving forces, strategies that reduce demand can help contain the rise in prices, making food more affordable for populations at higher risk of hunger.

Avoiding food sources that are resource-inefficient is also an effective strategy that could be adopted by many. A major drain on the world’s food supply is the use of croplands to produce animal feed. Despite requiring about 80% of the planet’s farmland, meat and dairy provide just 18% of calories and 37% of protein consumed globally. These figures are not surprising: as the ‘middle-man’ in the food production chain, farm animals use most of the food they consume for their own survival (e.g., metabolic processes, thermoregulation, locomotion). No matter how efficiently feed is converted into meat and milk, energy and nutrients are inevitably wasted, along with the agricultural inputs (e.g., fertilizers, fuel) used to produce them. To put these numbers in perspective, if the use of crops as animal feed were halved, over a billion more people could be fed. Animal-sourced foods are also energetically demanding to produce and store, requiring continuous refrigeration.
Initiatives and policies that teach and incentivize society to make proper use of resource- and energy-efficient food sources can be, therefore, a great asset in times of hardship. Protein-rich foods such as beans, soy, lentils and chickpeas are in this category. They can also be stored safely with minimum logistical requirements (including the absence of electricity), providing adequate nutrition for large groups of people for long periods of time.

If forecasts are correct, global hunger may be at our doorstep. But it can be alleviated if we use our food more wisely. In a world where many are vulnerable to the risks of starvation, even small changes can have a profound impact.

TAKE ACTION!

Individual initiatives:
  1. Those able to increase food production, from leisure farms to backyards allotments, should do it.
  2. Make proper use of resource and energy-efficient food sources: use more protein-rich foods such as beans, soy, lentils, and chickpeas – and plant-based foods in general.
Government initiatives:
  1. Support and adopt programs aiming to reduce dependence on animal-sourced food, such as Meatless Monday in schools, canteens, government places and events etc.
  2. Support and subsidize programs to stimulate the production of vegetables and legumes of small producers and producers in general.
Signup to IVU's Newsletter clicking here
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World Vegan Month

The World Vegan Month was first created in 1994 by Louise Wallis, the then President of The Vegan Society. She was looking for a way to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Vegan Society. She knew the society was founded sometime in November 1944, but not the exact date. So, she decided for November 1st.

Since then, World Vegan Day initiates a month celebrating plant-based diets and the vegan movement across the globe. World Vegan Month was initiated to spread the vegan message of avoiding all animal products and living a cruelty-free lifestyle.

World Vegan Month follows October’s Vegetarian Awareness Month or World Vegetarian Month, and both movements share practically the same messages. Nowadays every year there are numerous events the world over, promoting plant-based diets and vegan lifestyle.

IVU WORLD VEGAN MONTH - 2021
 
ADD MORE PLANTS TO YOUR PLATE

WHAT VEGANS EAT:

WHOLE GRAINS, LIKE OATS, CORN, BREADS, RICE AND PASTA

STARCHY VEGETABLES, LIKE POTATOS, YAM, CASSAVA

LEGUMES SUCH AS PEAS, BEANS AND LENTILS, TOFU, SEITAN, TEMPEH

MOCK MEATS LIKE SAUSAGE, VEGGIE BURGERS, SOY CHORIZO ETC.

VEGETABLES

ALGAE AND SPROUTED SEEDS

MUSHROOMS AND NUTRITIONAL YEAST

FRUITS

NUTS AND SEEDS

VEGETABLE OILS

NATURAL CONDIMENTS AND SPICES

FERMENTED FOODS SUCH AS MISO, NATTO, SAUERKRAUT, KOMBUCHA, PICKLES, KIMCHI

DAIRY ALTERNATIVES, SUCH AS SOYMILK, COCONUT MILK AND ALMOND MILK AND PRODUCTS MADE WITH VEGETABLES MILK SUCH AS VEGAN CHEESE, YOGURT ETC.

IVU IS TOTALLY UPDATING ITS HUGE COLLECTION OF VEGAN RECIPES.

CELEBRATING THE WORLD VEGAN MONTH 2021 IT IS LAUNCHING ITS

 

Water is Life!

Fresh water is necessary for the survival of all living organisms on Earth. Our bodies are made up of about 60% water and we cannot survive more than a few days without it.

On average, a vegan, a person who doesn't eat meat or dairy, indirectly consumes nearly 600 gallons of water per day less than a person who eats the average American diet.

Read more: World Vegan Month

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Download the Vegetarian Nutrition Booklet for Kids and Adolescents