Department of Fund-raising

Key Responsibilities:

* Develop a sustainable, ethical, and long-term strategy for fundraising in conjunction with IVU’s financial ambitions and organisational goals. 

* Develop strong networks, internal and external partnerships to support IVU’s fundraising, wider development strategies and ambitions. 

* Develop and maintain effective supporter journeys, ensuring exceptional relationship management for all accounts within the supporter and philanthropy portfolio. From initial contact through to cultivation, solicitation, stewardship and if applicable retention.  

* Establish a strategy for generating revenue through newfound diverse means by identifying new potential income streams including grants and donors. Ensure access to such funds by producing effective, high-quality proposals and reports. 

* Identify opportunities to build new relationships on an international scale as well as representing IVU at various events to effectively increase network.  

* Set targets whilst monitoring the planning, budgetary and accounts on a regular basis, adapting operational plans as necessary.

Director: Asa Kaur Narinder

Asa Kaur has been a staunch vegetarian since birth, her devotion to the vegan movement and altruistic pursuits stem from her spirituality and heritage. She founded the Veg-N Society, a spiritually inclined non-profit organisation based on Namdhari cultural assets and ideologies.

Embracing the importance of utilising food as a crucial tool for effective animal activism, Asa provided a basis for action through her contributions as a plant-based recipe developer. Focusing on enabling a systemic change, her work within philanthropy is centred around demolishing factory farming and accelerating alternative protein innovation.

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Global hunger is coming: how to help those at risk

seal IVU SLOGAN
The Russian invasion of Ukraine is rapidly disrupting the global supply of energy and food. In addition to Russia’s role as a large exporter of natural gas and oil, Russia and Ukraine together are responsible for about one-quarter of the global wheat exports, one-fifth of the global maize and barley and nearly two-thirds of the traded sunflower oil. Together with Belarus, they also produce over a third of the potassium, and about 15 percent of the phosphorus and nitrogen that are used to fertilize a large fraction of the crops that feed the world today. Naturally, energy and food prices (already high following the COVID-19 pandemic) are soaring, and major food shortages are expected still this year. The promise of hunger and hardship for tens of millions (2 billion people in some estimates) as of the end of this year should not be taken lightly.

Many societal emergencies leave no time for preventing their worst effects, therefore the exceptional advantage offered by the early warning of a global food crisis should not go wasted. There are, in fact, effective ways to optimize the use of available food and agricultural inputs, many of which are accessible to citizens, communities, institutions and governments. Reducing food waste - estimated at about 15-20 percent of total global food production at the household stage - is among them. A call for a relief effort would also be granted: those able to increase food production, from leisure farms to backyard allotments, should do it. While food security is the outcome of multiple driving forces, strategies that reduce demand can help contain the rise in prices, making food more affordable for populations at higher risk of hunger.

Avoiding food sources that are resource-inefficient is also an effective strategy that could be adopted by many. A major drain on the world’s food supply is the use of croplands to produce animal feed. Despite requiring about 80% of the planet’s farmland, meat and dairy provide just 18% of calories and 37% of protein consumed globally. These figures are not surprising: as the ‘middle-man’ in the food production chain, farm animals use most of the food they consume for their own survival (e.g., metabolic processes, thermoregulation, locomotion). No matter how efficiently feed is converted into meat and milk, energy and nutrients are inevitably wasted, along with the agricultural inputs (e.g., fertilizers, fuel) used to produce them. To put these numbers in perspective, if the use of crops as animal feed were halved, over a billion more people could be fed. Animal-sourced foods are also energetically demanding to produce and store, requiring continuous refrigeration.
Initiatives and policies that teach and incentivize society to make proper use of resource- and energy-efficient food sources can be, therefore, a great asset in times of hardship. Protein-rich foods such as beans, soy, lentils and chickpeas are in this category. They can also be stored safely with minimum logistical requirements (including the absence of electricity), providing adequate nutrition for large groups of people for long periods of time.

If forecasts are correct, global hunger may be at our doorstep. But it can be alleviated if we use our food more wisely. In a world where many are vulnerable to the risks of starvation, even small changes can have a profound impact.

TAKE ACTION!

Individual initiatives:
  1. Those able to increase food production, from leisure farms to backyards allotments, should do it.
  2. Make proper use of resource and energy-efficient food sources: use more protein-rich foods such as beans, soy, lentils, and chickpeas – and plant-based foods in general.
Government initiatives:
  1. Support and adopt programs aiming to reduce dependence on animal-sourced food, such as Meatless Monday in schools, canteens, government places and events etc.
  2. Support and subsidize programs to stimulate the production of vegetables and legumes of small producers and producers in general.
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Vegan Food Academy

Over 200 recipes everyone can make. Browse through all categories and pick your favorite dish for every occasion.

  • Vietnamese
  • Whole Food Plant-based
  • Desserts
  • Drinks
  • Vegan Cheese

Hi, welcome, Explore
our Latest Recipes


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Discover our YouTube Channel suggestions

Dozens of Youtube Vegan Chefs and Culinarists channels full of tutorials. Learn the tips and tricks that will make your vegan recipes a success among vegans and non vegans alike.


Obs.: It's possible to activate the subtitles on the video! To put the subtitles in english just click on the engine icon (details) so you may choose the language you prefer. 

Read more: Vegan Food Academy

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World Vegan Month

The World Vegan Month was first created in 1994 by Louise Wallis, the then President of The Vegan Society. She was looking for a way to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Vegan Society. She knew the society was founded sometime in November 1944, but not the exact date. So, she decided for November 1st.

Since then, World Vegan Day initiates a month celebrating plant-based diets and the vegan movement across the globe. World Vegan Month was initiated to spread the vegan message of avoiding all animal products and living a cruelty-free lifestyle.

World Vegan Month follows October’s Vegetarian Awareness Month or World Vegetarian Month, and both movements share practically the same messages. Nowadays every year there are numerous events the world over, promoting plant-based diets and vegan lifestyle.

IVU WORLD VEGAN MONTH - 2021
 
ADD MORE PLANTS TO YOUR PLATE

WHAT VEGANS EAT:

WHOLE GRAINS, LIKE OATS, CORN, BREADS, RICE AND PASTA

STARCHY VEGETABLES, LIKE POTATOS, YAM, CASSAVA

LEGUMES SUCH AS PEAS, BEANS AND LENTILS, TOFU, SEITAN, TEMPEH

MOCK MEATS LIKE SAUSAGE, VEGGIE BURGERS, SOY CHORIZO ETC.

VEGETABLES

ALGAE AND SPROUTED SEEDS

MUSHROOMS AND NUTRITIONAL YEAST

FRUITS

NUTS AND SEEDS

VEGETABLE OILS

NATURAL CONDIMENTS AND SPICES

FERMENTED FOODS SUCH AS MISO, NATTO, SAUERKRAUT, KOMBUCHA, PICKLES, KIMCHI

DAIRY ALTERNATIVES, SUCH AS SOYMILK, COCONUT MILK AND ALMOND MILK AND PRODUCTS MADE WITH VEGETABLES MILK SUCH AS VEGAN CHEESE, YOGURT ETC.

IVU IS TOTALLY UPDATING ITS HUGE COLLECTION OF VEGAN RECIPES.

CELEBRATING THE WORLD VEGAN MONTH 2021 IT IS LAUNCHING ITS

 

Water is Life!

Fresh water is necessary for the survival of all living organisms on Earth. Our bodies are made up of about 60% water and we cannot survive more than a few days without it.

On average, a vegan, a person who doesn't eat meat or dairy, indirectly consumes nearly 600 gallons of water per day less than a person who eats the average American diet.

Read more: World Vegan Month

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IVU Department of Medicine and Nutrition

The IVU Department of Medicine and Nutrition aims to:
  • Provide materials showing the nutritional viability of vegetarian and vegan diet for people of all ages, from infants, teens, adults and old people, supported by indexed scientific literature.

  • Promote medical and nutritional conducts compatible with the vegetarian choice (of any type), offering security to the health professional and the population as a whole.
dr eric slywitchDirector: Dr Eric Slywitch is a Medical Doctor, with a Master's and Doctorate in the area of nutrition, with the theme of metabolic evaluation of vegetarians and omnivores. He specializes in Nutrology, Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition. He has a postgraduate degree in Endocrinology, Clinical Nutrition and Psychoanalysis. He is the author of 3 books on vegetarianism in Brazil and has published several chapters on vegetarianism in the main technical books of nutrition in Brazil. He teaches in 3 postgraduate courses addressing the theme of vegetarianism and has his own teaching center for metabolic and nutritional evaluation with emphasis on interpreting laboratory tests for physicians and nutritionists.

PROJECTS

THE IVU GUIDE TO VEGAN NUTRITION FOR ADULTS



The IVU Vegan Nutrition Guide for Adults was elaborated with the aim of serving as a comprehensive and free support material for health professionals worldwide, in its scientific version, and for the general population, in its version for lay people. It addresses the nutritional care we should have when adopting a strict vegetarian (vegan) diet safely, based on more than 700 studies indexed in the international scientific literature. It contains a Nutritional Table of each key nutrient in the diet, presenting the richest foods of each food group.

It addresses the bioavailability, physiology and biochemistry of these nutrients in the context of vegetarianism, besides showing what is in studies about them in the context of this food approach.

It also discusses supplementation and care in laboratory nutritional assessment. At its end it has more than 30 different menus, calculated according to its nutritional value (to demonstrate the safety of the diet), covering eating habits of the main continents.

DOWNLOAD YOUR COPY FOR FREE!

1. PARTNERSHIP WITH BRAZILIAN VEGETARIAN SOCIETY (SVB)

The partner will work to make the Guide visible and to be adopted by the organs and entities; will help with correspondence to be sent and by monitoring the feedback of those interested in adopting the Guide. He will post the materials generated for the dissemination and implementation of the Guide and look for forms of funding to the Project.

2. REGION REPRESENTATIVE IN LATIN AMERICA - VEGETARIANOS HOY FROM CHILE

The Representative for LATIN AMERICA is Vegetarianos Hoy who will work with Spanish version of the Guide, helping it to be visible and adopted by organs and entities (Universities, class organs and health professionals as a whole). The Spanish version of the Guide was made by Vegetarianos Hoy.



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Nutrition

Download the Vegetarian Nutrition Booklet for Kids and Adolescents

Free

The International Vegetarian Union’s Vegan Nutrition Guide for Adults

Free material, in 2 versions:

  • For healthcare professionals
  • For non-healthcare professionals
Free recipe book
Free

The International Vegetarian Union’s Vegan Nutrition Guide for Adults

Free material, in 2 versions:

  • For healthcare professionals
  • For non-healthcare professionals